September 2017 – Westminster Roundup

Key appointments:

Lord Nash will be stepping down as an Education Minister and will be replaced by Sir Theodore Agnew, current chairman of the Inspiration Trust. Read more

Chris Millward is confirmed as new Director for Fair Access and Participation at the Office for Students. Read More

 

Key announcements:

National Funding Formula

Justine Greening announced the Government’s response to the second stage of the National Funding Formula. The new formula will provide at least £4,800 per pupil for every secondary school and £3,500 per pupil for every primary school in 2019-20. However, although £4,800 per secondary school pupil will be given to local authorities, Local Authorities can decide how to allocate this with that amount not being ringfenced for those pupils.

If you’re interested in looking at the Government response in full, it can be found here. The mention of the work of the EEF on Pupil Premium can be found here.

 

EEF/Sutton Trust Mentions:

In the HE / Regulations debate, Gordon Marden MP cited the Trust’s recent Aspirations Polling when arguing that young people were being put off going to university due to the increase in fees.

EEF is mentioned in the Fair Education Alliance report card report – read it here.

EEF is mentioned during committee stage of Financial Guidance and Claims Bill. Lord Young of Cookham referred to the EEF’s Maths in Context trial as an example of what a new body to advise the Secretary of State on the role of Ofsted and the primary school curriculum might do. You can find a link to the Hansard here and the transcript for the whole session here.

Baroness Stedman-Scott tabled a Motion to Take Note on English Baccalaureate: Creative and Technical Subjects in the House of Lords, to take note of the impact on the EBacc on the take up of creative subjects. She argued for a wider ranging EBacc saying that EBaccs only provide a core curriculum and that low attainers may not choose to take on creative subjects.

Lord Nash, in his response, cited the Sutton Trust’s ‘Changing the Subject’ report which suggests that pupil premium students largely benefited from an introduction of the EBacc. You can find his response here and the full Hansard here.

2018-02-05T14:36:27+00:00 October 5th, 2017|Categories: Policy Advocacy, Policy News|

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