Oxford University promises 25% of places to disadvantaged

Sean Coughlan cites Sutton Trust research and features Sutton Trust founder, Sir Peter Lampl’s comment in an article for the BBC.

University of Oxford is promising a “sea-change” in admissions, with plans for a quarter of students to come from disadvantaged backgrounds by 2023.

The university wants to tackle accusations that it is socially exclusive.

Oxford will soon announce that 60.5% of its most recent intake are from state schools – the highest since the 1970s.

But vice-chancellor Louise Richardson says she wants to “accelerate the pace at which we are diversifying”.

Oxford, along with other top universities, has faced claims of perpetuating privilege – with too many privately-educated students and not enough from poorer backgrounds.

The Sutton Trust social mobility charity showed recently that Oxford and Cambridge recruit more students from eight, mostly-private schools than almost 3,000 other UK state schools put together.

Labour MP David Lammy has lambasted the university for admitting too few black students.

The university wants to send a strong signal that it remains very competitive to get a place – but that should be about ability rather than background.

Prof Richardson says she wants to ensure that “every academically exceptional student in the country knows that they have a fair chance of a place at Oxford”.

She is being supported by the head of the Sutton Trust, Sir Peter Lampl, who described the scale of Oxford’s target as “really impressive”.

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2019-05-23T10:54:10+01:00May 21st, 2019|Categories: Featured news, In the News|

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