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Category: In the News

Elite degree is springboard to success

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Our Chief Executive, Lee Elliot Major, is quoted in the Times on the over-representation of Oxbridge graduates in elite professions. A degree, and preferably a good one from an elite university, is a crucial ingredient for doing well in life, say academics in America and Germany who studied almost 12,000 leaders in the United States,… Read more »

Schools’ Poor Call

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The Sun outlines key policies to improve social mobility in our Mobility Manifesto, released ahead of the General Election. Grammar schools must recruit more of the poorest pupils – before they’re allowed to expand, a hard-hitting report says today. The respected Sutton Trust has also demanded the best state secondaries surrender half their places to… Read more »

The Sutton Trust’s Degrees of Debt report is cited in the Daily Mail’s coverage of UCAS comments on graduate employment. Students should not worry about getting a job until six months after graduating, the outgoing head of UCAS has said. Universities and parents have become ‘too fixated’ with degrees as the start of a career, according… Read more »

Rob Davies and Elena Creci cited Sutton Trust research in a Guardian news feature on internships Wanted: an undergraduate to take a full-time position with a major international fashion retailer. The job will last for a year. The pay? Zero. This fantastic opportunity, doubtless available only to those with independent means, wealthy parents and access… Read more »

The Sutton Trust and our sister charity, the Education Endowment Foundation, receive recognition for our evidence-based research on the best school strategies in the Financial Times. At the start of the summer term, let us hail Brandy Young. The elementary school teacher from Texas announced last year that her class would no longer receive homework.“Eat… Read more »

The Daily Mail quotes our Chairman, Sir Peter Lampl, in response to new proposals to improve access to grammar schools for ‘ordinary working families’. Quotas could be introduced for new grammar schools to prioritise pupils from families earning around £33,000 or less. Education Secretary Justine Greening said these ‘ordinary working families’ had previously ‘fallen under… Read more »

Our Chief Executive, Lee Elliot Major, is quoted in the Guardian’s coverage of Justine Greening’s speech on grammar schools.   The education secretary, Justine Greening, has denied that the government is ignoring the poorest families in Theresa May’s drive for a new wave of grammar schools, after setting out a focus on “ordinary working families”… Read more »

Cash for poor pupils used to fill budget gap

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Rosemary Bennett at The Times covers our newly released teacher polling. The pupil premium designed to help children from poor backgrounds is being used by almost a third of head teachers to plug gaps in their budgets, according to a think tank. A survey of 1,361 teaching professionals also found that two thirds of schools… Read more »

Schools ‘cut staff due to funding shortages’

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Katherine Sellgren for BBC News online covers our newly released teacher polling. Schools in England are cutting back on teachers and teaching assistants (TAs) because of financial constraints, a survey for the Sutton Trust suggests. The poll found 49% of primary schools and 57% of secondaries have cut back on TAs, while 18% of primaries… Read more »

Pupils from wealthy homes tend to earn more

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Helen Warrell of the Financial Times quotes our Chairman in a piece on Justine Greening’s speech to the Social Mobility Commission conference. Low-achieving pupils from rich families will typically go on to earn more than talented poorer children, according to UK education secretary Justine Greening. Ms Greening — who is the first education secretary to… Read more »