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Category: Blog

Britain’s self-perpetuating elite

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Lee Elliot Major says that an increasingly exclusive rich is bad news for social mobility. The tell-tale signs of our self-perpetuating elite can be seen in recent apparently unconnected news stories. Figures from the Human Mortality Database (sadly a data resource to which we will all one day contribute) found that the gap between the… Read more »

At debt’s door

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Sir Peter Lampl on the implications of today’s Degrees of Debt report For some time, I’ve been worried about the levels of debt being amassed by British students. I backed the increases in tuition fees to £3,000 back in 2004 because I could see that it was necessary to fund universities. But then there was… Read more »

Primary data

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James Richardson, Senior Analyst at the Education Endowment Foundation, discusses how their Families of Schools database can help schools understand and overcome their common challenges. For teachers, context is king. How can we understand the challenges of any one school until we have actually taught there? It might be true that nothing can substitute for hours in… Read more »

Primary selection

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Conor Ryan on the implications of today’s report on primary admissions On Monday, hundreds of thousands of parents in England will learn whether or not they have secured a place for their children at their preferred primary school. For many, that will be their nearest primary; for others it may be faith-based schools. For some,… Read more »

A Legal Affair

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Kathryn Davies, Senior Programmes Manager at the Trust, celebrates the successes of the students on our Pathways Plus programme. Nearly 100 students attended a very special dinner at the Inner Temple on Tuesday night to celebrate the Pathways Plus programme. The students were welcomed by the chief executive (sub-treasurer) of the Inner Temple, Patrick Maddams… Read more »

Engaging parents

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Naomi Eisenstadt from University of Oxford on how we can work with parents to give us the best possible chance of improving outcomes for children. Parental engagement is often regarded as the missing link by educators, that elusive ingredient in the educational journey. The feeling is that if we get it right we can see… Read more »

Graphic Inequality

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Lee Elliot Major and John Jerrim look at international social mobility, education and income inequality through five key graphs. The study of education inequality and social mobility increasingly feels like a small world. The British Prime Minister David Cameron hopes for improved educational opportunities for disadvantaged children. President Barack Obama has put the issue of… Read more »

Best in Class: afternoon report

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Matt Rodda, summit rapporteur, reports from the afternoon session at Best in Class. The challenge of improving leadership, together with how to learn from international best practice was raised as Chief Inspector Sir Michael Wilshaw and the OECD’s Andreas Schleicher made their contributions to Best in Class, a social mobility summit organised by the Sutton Trust in partnership… Read more »

Best in Class: morning report

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Matt Rodda, summit rapporteur, reports from the morning session at Best in Class. Schools Minister, Nick Gibb, reiterated the Government’s commitment to improving opportunities for disadvantaged pupils and challenged local councils to do more to improve schools, at a joint Sutton Trust and Carnegie social mobility summit, Best in Class, which was held today. He… Read more »

Access to the top

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Justin Madders MP, Chair of the Social Mobility APPG, Co-Chair Baroness Tyler, and Flick Drummond MP, discuss their prospective inquiry with the Sutton Trust into access into leading professions We know from the Sutton Trust’s research that almost a third of MPs in the House of Commons are privately educated, about half of the Cabinet,… Read more »