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Category: Blog

Methodology matters

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Kathy Sylva on how different methods in early years education research can draw different conclusions.  We know that educational inequalities set in before children start school. At age five, there is already a 19-month difference in school readiness between the very richest and the poorest children, a gap that only widens and becomes more entrenched… Read more »

Admitting the problem

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Carl Cullinane on the background to the Selective Comprehensives report. Today, around half a million families across England will discover which secondary school their child will be attending from September. As application rates have increased in recent years, this process has become more and more competitive, with many schools, particularly the better ones, increasingly oversubscribed. While… Read more »

The data deficit effect

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Conor Ryan on how a dearth of data helped the Sutton Trust make news in Scotland. A funny thing happened with our Global Gaps report a couple of weeks ago. John Jerrim’s excellent look at the different performance of highly able 15 year-olds from different social backgrounds gained some good – but not spectacular –… Read more »

Summer school successes

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Sir Peter Lampl reflects on twenty years of UK Summer Schools. It’s hard to believe the first Sutton Trust summer school took place twenty years ago. In the summer of 1997, 64 teenagers from across the UK came together for a residential at Oxford. Participants spent a week living as an undergraduate. They went to… Read more »

Comic Strip Presents

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Lee Elliot Major on a tale of privilege to coincide with our new Global Gaps report For many it’s the perfect portrayal of the cumulative impact that privilege can have on someone’s life. Two weeks ago I posted a link to a simple cartoon strip created by an illustrator in New Zealand. It sums up… Read more »

Science specialists

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Binda Patel looks at what a lack of specialist science teachers could mean for the growing UK STEM industries.  Science lessons on a Friday afternoon were always challenging, more so for my teacher than for me! I often wondered what inspired an Oxford graduate with a first-class degree to become a teacher. He could have been… Read more »

Breaking the Class Ceiling

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Conor Ryan on what this week’s news tells us about social mobility Education Secretary Justine Greening recalled yesterday how she’s missed out on a banking job because she hadn’t taken a gap year. “I was too embarrassed to admit that I simply couldn’t afford one,” she told an event organised jointly by the Sutton Trust… Read more »

Transatlantic Triumphs

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Hilary Cornwell reports on some of the successes in this year’s US Programme Studying in the States used to be just a dream for some British young people. But since 2012, it is increasingly a reality for able young people from modest family backgrounds in Britain. Each year, the Sutton Trust takes 150 teenagers to… Read more »

Insights from the Anglosphere

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Lee Elliot Major contrasts England’s education performance with other English speaking countries. “England and America are two countries divided by a common language.” Was this famous phrase uttered by George Bernard Shaw or Oscar Wilde? Either way, it was pertinent that the remark came from an Irishman: the same claim could now be made about… Read more »