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Welsh teenager fast-tracked to Yale

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Nicola Woolcock reports for The Times on Ellie Atkinson’s success in the Sutton Trust US programme Ellie Atkinson began competing in sport only to make up the numbers in a Welsh schools cross-country race. She came 56th. Spurred on by failure, she began training hard and has now represented her country — and won a… Read more »

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Jill Sherman in The Times highlights new Sutton Trust analysis on a North-South access divide Britain’s top universities have been ordered to step up efforts to attract talented pupils from the northern regions and areas of low achievement. Greg Clark, the cities and universities minister, has called on the Russell Group of universities to do much… Read more »

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Writing for The Times, Nicola Woolcock reports on the early success of this year’s Sutton Trust US Programme participants. Almost 40 British teenagers, many from lower-income families, have been awarded £5.5 million in financial aid to attend universities in the United States. Two thirds of the students are from households earning less than £25,000 a… Read more »

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Oxbridge graduates earn thousands more than peers

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Greg Hurst reports for the Times on the Sutton Trust’s Earning by Degrees report. Graduates of Oxford and Cambridge earn a first salary £3,300 higher than those who studied at other elite universities and £7,600 higher than students at new universities, a study has found. Oxbridge students whose own parents did not go to university… Read more »

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Sir Peter Lampl writes to The Times about Pathways to Medicine Sir, The Sutton Trust welcomes the Medical Schools Council’s recognition that more must be done to improve access to a career in medicine for students from low and middle-income backgrounds. This year we launched a pilot programme with Imperial College London that will take… Read more »

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Sutton Trust research director Conor Ryan writes for The Times on lessons from the primary school test results. Yesterday’s league tables brought mixed news for England’s primary schools. Overall, standards are rising, particularly in literacy, with more children than ever achieving good results in the 3Rs. But nearly 800 schools — one in 20 — failed to… Read more »

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Tuition fees force students to US in record numbers

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Greg Hurst highlighted the Sutton Trust US programme in a Times article on students going to American universities. Record numbers of British students have opted to study at leading universities in the United States since the coalition’s decision to triple tuition fees. Figures published today show that 10,191 students from Britain were studying at American… Read more »

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Writing for the Times, columnist Deborah Ross reflects on new Sutton Trust research into unpaid internships. A study has found that unpaid internships can cost interns £1,000 a month, but the cost to society is far higher Hot on the heels of the Oxford University-LSE study that showed upward social mobility is faltering comes the Sutton… Read more »

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Unpaid internships cost graduates at least £5,556

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The Times reports on new Sutton Trust research into unpaid internships. An unpaid six month internship leaves graduates at least £5,556 out of pocket, according to a study which analysed their typical bills for rent, transport and subsistence while they work for free. It found a third of all internships are unpaid despite a groundswell… Read more »

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Ability groups and too much praise can harm pupils

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Nicola Woolcock reported from the Times on new Sutton Trust research on teaching practices. Teaching children in ability sets can be harmful to their education, experts warn in a report today. They also claim that excessively praising pupils can do more harm than good. Grouping children by academic ability into sets is criticised in the… Read more »