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Girls leaving boys behind as tuition fees bite

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Writing for the Times, Nicola Woolcock reports on the Sutton Trust’s Independent Commission on Fees report into student debt. Tuition fees have widened the gender gap with ever more girls going to university, according to a report published today. A third of young women aged 18 begin degrees at university, compared with a quarter of their… Read more »

Lee Elliot Major was quoted in The Times discussing giving children summer school work.  Research shows that by September children will be two months behind in academic skills. Rachel Carlyle asks the experts how to keep kids motivated Remember your own school summer holidays? Chances are it was an idyllic time of den building and trips… Read more »

Writing for The Times, Greg Hurst reports on new Sutton Trust findings regarding teacher’s educational backgrounds. About 11,000 graduates from Oxford or Cambridge now teach in state-funded schools — a number that has doubled in a decade. The figures released yesterday show that work by successive governments to attract more of the brightest graduates into… Read more »

Sir Peter Lampl wrote a letter to The Times about the ‘poshness’ report from the Social Mobility Commission Rachel Sylvester is right to urge the prime minister to seize the chance to tackle social mobility (“Tories have chance to shatter the glass ceiling”, Opinion, June 16). Research for the Sutton Trust last year found that… Read more »

Poor bright boys struggle with GCSEs

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Greg Hurst reported for The Times on our Missing Talent report. More than a third of bright boys from disadvantaged families underachieve in their GCSE exams, research indicates. Many highly able poor children achieve A and B grades at GCSE, while better-off classmates of similar ability achieve A*s in eight core subjects, according to a… Read more »

Greg Hurst reported for The Times on the Sutton Trust social mobility index. Bright children from poor families fare up to ten times worse in some schools depending on where they live, data from a charity suggests. Teenagers from disadvantaged homes were five times less likely to go to a top university in the worst-performing… Read more »