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Insights from the Anglosphere

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Lee Elliot Major contrasts England’s education performance with other English speaking countries. “England and America are two countries divided by a common language.” Was this famous phrase uttered by George Bernard Shaw or Oscar Wilde? Either way, it was pertinent that the remark came from an Irishman: the same claim could now be made about… Read more »

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Top ten Oxbridge tips for teachers

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Lee Elliot Major revisits his popular top ten tips for teachers on enabling their students to apply to Oxford and Cambridge. Sutton Trust surveys have suggested that less than half of secondary state school teachers would advise their highest pupils to apply to Oxford and Cambridge universities. I’ve always thought that it is one of… Read more »

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Shining a light on outreach

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Lee Elliot Major welcomes moves to create a more evidence led approach to widening access. In the grand ancient dining hall of St John’s College, Oxford last week, I had the pleasure of talking with a host of teachers – heads of sixth forms, newly qualified trainees, senior leaders, and history, English and psychology specialists…. Read more »

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Rethinking university access

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Lee Elliot Major on a graph that questions our assumptions on measuring academic potential Every now and then you see a graph that makes you sit up and think again. I came across one such graph this week. And it prompted me to think the unthinkable! It questions our assumptions over how we assess young… Read more »

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It was unveiled exactly five years ago today. Nine months in gestation, costing only £14,000 to produce, the Pupil Premium Toolkit started life as a 20-page report published by the Sutton Trust. There had been summaries of education research before. But what made our Toolkit different was its accessible ‘Which guide’ format designed specifically with… Read more »

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Britain’s self-perpetuating elite

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Lee Elliot Major says that an increasingly exclusive rich is bad news for social mobility. The tell-tale signs of our self-perpetuating elite can be seen in recent apparently unconnected news stories. Figures from the Human Mortality Database (sadly a data resource to which we will all one day contribute) found that the gap between the… Read more »

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Graphic Inequality

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Lee Elliot Major and John Jerrim look at international social mobility, education and income inequality through five key graphs. The study of education inequality and social mobility increasingly feels like a small world. The British Prime Minister David Cameron hopes for improved educational opportunities for disadvantaged children. President Barack Obama has put the issue of… Read more »

Lee Elliot Major and Philip Kirby on what our Leading People 2016 report means for access to top professions. Britain’s got talent: that’s the powerful message the privately-educated pop mogul Simon Cowell has cleverly embraced to produce the successful television show that plucks unknown talents and thrusts them into the limelight. But what exactly is… Read more »

OECD at a glance

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Lee Elliot Major on ten take-home messages from the latest global education comparisons I managed to catch Andreas Schleicher in London yesterday on the latest stop of his whirlwind world tour presenting the latest OECD international comparisons of education. This is now a truly global event. Andreas had just flown in from a trip that… Read more »

Too many children left behind

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Lee Elliot Major on more startling evidence on widening attainment gaps as children get older. I had the privilege of speaking to a packed lecture theatre at the London School of Economics last week. I was asked to respond to the findings of the most powerful international study yet on education inequality in the early… Read more »