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Category: Blog

Success in the States

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Julie Randles celebrates the early successes of the students taking part in our US Programme this year. December is always full of anticipation – for Christmas, for the end of term, and for the nights finally starting to get a bit shorter. For the students taking part in our US Programme this year, they had the added… Read more »

Shining a light on university access

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Lee Elliot Major and Sophie Maddocks on the background to today’s Evaluating Access report. The Government’s call to double the proportion of young people from disadvantaged backgrounds enrolling onto degrees by 2020 has put further pressure on universities to show that their efforts to widen access are paying off. The latest UCAS figures today reveal… Read more »

Is social mobility improving?

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Sir Peter Lampl reflects on the past decade and asks if social mobility is improving. In 2005, we published one of the most widely quoted and influential studies in the Sutton Trust’s history. In a comparison of eight European and North American countries, researchers from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of… Read more »

OECD at a glance

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Lee Elliot Major on ten take-home messages from the latest global education comparisons I managed to catch Andreas Schleicher in London yesterday on the latest stop of his whirlwind world tour presenting the latest OECD international comparisons of education. This is now a truly global event. Andreas had just flown in from a trip that… Read more »

Leading legals

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Justice is blind. But is it education blind? Kathryn Davies and Philip Kirby on social mobility in the UK legal profession. Several years ago, the Sutton Trust analysed the educational backgrounds of the UK’s top judges. In 1989, three quarters (76%) of them had gone to private schools. By 2004, this figure had lowered –… Read more »

Access in Alba

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Julie Randles sees access in action on visits to St Andrews and Durham. I’ve spent the past week visiting our partner universities in Scotland. It was great to go back to St Andrews, where I was an undergraduate more years ago than I care to mention; certainly the university and the town have changed a… Read more »

Student architecture

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Conor Ryan asks whether the HE green paper plans really will empower disadvantaged students. Green and white papers are published for a variety of reasons, aside from the need to ‘consult’ prior to legislation. A new minister wants to make his or her mark. The government needs to save money. A department wants to show… Read more »

Investing in Literacy

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Sir Kevan Collins on the Education Endowment Foundation’s new campaign to improve literacy levels in the North East.  Much has been made of the transformation of inner-London schools into an education powerhouse; their achievements are certainly one of the success stories of recent times. But as schools in the capital consistently produce great results, particularly… Read more »

Too many children left behind

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Lee Elliot Major on more startling evidence on widening attainment gaps as children get older. I had the privilege of speaking to a packed lecture theatre at the London School of Economics last week. I was asked to respond to the findings of the most powerful international study yet on education inequality in the early… Read more »

A test of character

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Sir Peter Lampl on why today’s new EEF trials of character education could help improve vital social skills for disadvantaged young people. The debate on school standards too often comes up against a false dichotomy. We can either teach knowledge or skills, we are told. Yet powerful new Harvard research suggests that picking one without… Read more »