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Category: Blog

Too Young To Count?

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James Turner examines the challenges of working with younger pupils Last week, the OFFA chief Les Ebdon said that universities should look to work more with younger age groups. We couldn’t agree more. The Sutton Trust has always believed at intervention at every phase of education, and we have a proud history of supporting initiatives reaching younger… Read more »

Lucinda Denney: My Welcome to Yale

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18 year-old Lucinda Denney, an A-level student from Blackpool, is one of 12 students already offered places at leading US universities, thanks to the Sutton Trust summer school. As our guest blogger today, she reflects on going to Yale. When I was accepted to the Sutton Trust’s US Summer School Programme, I could never have even… Read more »

The Trouble With Boys

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Conor Ryan reflects on David Willetts’ latest initiative to persuade more white working class boys to study at university Universities minister David Willetts was quick off the blocks for 2013 with his ideas on how to encourage white working class boys to go to university. Young women are now a third more likely than young men to… Read more »

Moving Up the Great Gatsby Curve

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How do you slide down the Great Gatsby Curve? This is the question posed by the Canadian economist, Miles Corak in his latest paper on a simple but powerful graph that has attracted much attention on the other side of the Pond. The graph encapsulates arguably the biggest social challenge facing highly developed countries in the early… Read more »

Obama’s chance for gun law change

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Sir Peter Lampl draws parallels with Dunblane after the Newtown massacre Watching with horror reports from Newtown, Connecticut last weekend of the killing of 20 young children and six of their teachers, I couldn’t help but be struck by the similarities with Dunblane. Back in March 1996, Thomas Hamilton walked into a classroom in that Scottish town, armed… Read more »

On your bike – social mobility outside London

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James Turner says that a priority is spreading the riches of opportunity beyond the capital A young man from a deprived borough of London, with immigrant parents, was describing his aspiration to read Law at Oxbridge. He listed the opportunities he’d accessed over the last two years in pursuit of this dream: an internship programme,… Read more »

Turning the Tables

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Last week’s publication of a new global education league table by the Economist Intelligence Unit and Pearson raised some eyebrows with its claim that the UK’s education system now ranks sixth in the developed world. After all, on the same day, the Chief Inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw was using the data from the OECD’s Programme for International Student… Read more »

The American Revolution in Teacher Evaluation

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Lee Elliott Major on the American revolution in teacher evaluation, and the lessons for the UK From Colorado to Tennessee, from Florida to New Jersey, all across the United States, a revolution in education is taking place. And it is likely to hit British schools anytime soon. Teachers are for the first time being evaluated… Read more »

The Sutton Trust at 15

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It is fifteen years since I set up the Sutton Trust to improve social mobility in this country. I wanted to ensure that bright children from low or middle income homes had a fair chance of going to a top university and into a leading profession or occupation. There has been progress in the last… Read more »

A Thousand Flowers Wilt?

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James Turner suggests that more coherence in social mobility programmes would benefit everyone One of the privileges of working at the Sutton Trust is the chance to meet people who have been inspired to dedicate their working lives to improving educational opportunity. Many have given up more conventional (and high paying) careers and taken the… Read more »